Afraid of compliments?

By David Joel Miller.

Reasons you can’t accept a compliment.

Compliments.

Compliments.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

If you find it difficult to accept a compliment, you need to ask yourself, is it humility or low self-esteem? People with adequate self-esteem can accept compliments when they are offered. If you’re finding it difficult to accept compliments, the thoughts and beliefs below may be the cause of your inability to accept compliments.

People with adequate self-esteem can accept compliments when they are offered. If you’re finding it difficult to accept compliments, the thoughts and beliefs below may be the cause of your inability to accept compliments. If you’re finding it difficult to accept compliments, the thoughts and beliefs below may be the cause of your inability to accept compliments.

How many of these compliment interfering thoughts are you holding onto?

You are used to people giving insincere compliments.

If you grew up in a home where you never got complimented for what you did, and the compliments you did get were backhanded insults, you’ve been conditioned to not believe compliments when you receive them. Abusive relationships may have undermined your confidence. When there’s a scarcity of water, people get poisoned by drinking from contaminated wells. If the compliments you received in the past were insincere, you’ve come to avoid even the truthful compliments.

You think you are a fraud.

If you view your successes as accidents, undeserved achievements, you may have an underlying belief that you are a fraud. Even highly successful and creative people are prone to the belief that their past accomplishments have been accidents and that they, in fact, have no ability. Your self-doubts, allowed to grow in magnitude, can leave you doubting your abilities.

You think they want something.

Most people have experienced encounters with flatterers. These people spread insincere compliments around to manipulate others. There’s a part of us that’s always wondering what the person who complimented us wants. When you receive a compliment, think carefully about the person who is giving you that compliment. Are they trustworthy or are they the kind of person who might be seeking to take advantage of you? Genuine people give compliments as a way of acknowledging achievements. If there are people in your life whose compliments seem insincere, you need to re-examine your relationships with them. Surround yourself with people you can trust, and you should have no difficulty in accepting their compliments.

Do you think accepting compliments makes you egotistical?

The belief that too many compliments make someone egotistical is a common misconception. Some parents try to raise their children by just expecting them to always be perfect. The result of never being praised for good behavior, but being constantly reprimanded for errors is a condition called “learned helplessness.”

Think of compliments in the same manner you think of your paycheck. If you work hard, you expect to get paid. Most people expect that over time hard work will result in pay raises. If your boss never pays you, most people won’t stay on the job long. If the things you do for others are not appreciated, you may find it hard to keep doing for them. The compliments that result in egotism are the ones that are handed out even when the person has not accomplished anything.

You don’t feel good about yourself.

Low self-esteem is both a symptom of and a major cause of inability to accept compliments. Work on accepting yourself just as you are. Getting to know both the good and the bad of yourself. Get comfortable with acknowledging to yourself when you’ve done something worthwhile. People who have an accurate self-view can feel good about their accomplishments, compliment themselves, without the need for excessive praise.

You are uncomfortable with appreciation.

Work on appreciating yourself, and others around you. Strive to believe that you are a worthwhile person just like everyone else. When you are in healthy relationships with others, you will both appreciate them, and they will appreciate you. Compliments are one way of expressing your appreciation for both what others do and for their presence in your life.

Are you ready to change your relationship with compliments?

Mentally healthy people get comfortable with both giving and accepting compliments. They are neither desperately hungry for compliments nor do they unnecessarily reject them. When someone offers you a compliment, consider it a gift. Rejecting the compliment, diminishing it by saying it was no big thing, is like rejecting the person who offered you the compliment

Accept the gift of a compliment just as you would some other small token. If you don’t trust the person or their motives, be careful about accepting their compliments. The best thing you can do when offered a compliment is simply to accept it with a gracious thank you.

What will you do to get more comfortable with giving and receiving compliments?

Want to sign up for my mailing list?

Get the latest updates on my books, due out later this year by signing up for my newsletter. Newsletter subscribers will also be notified about live training opportunities and free or discounted books. Sign up here – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog check out my Google+ page or the Facebook author’s page, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books

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Gratitude.

Sunday Inspiration.     Post by David Joel Miller.

Gratitude.

grateful

Gratitude

“Piglet noticed that even though he had a Very Small Heart, it could hold a rather large amount of Gratitude.”

― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

“Cultivate the habit of being grateful for every good thing that comes to you, and to give thanks continuously. And because all things have contributed to your advancement, you should include all things in your gratitude.”

― Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.”

― Epicurus

Wanted to share some inspirational quotes with you.  Today seemed like a good time to do this. If any of these quotes strike a chord with you, please share them.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Lessons Depression teaches you.

By David Joel Miller.

Are you learning from your issues?

Lessons Depression teaches you.

Lessons Depression teaches you.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

People who are able to learn from their problems do better in the future.  Whether you have an episode of  – Major Depressive Disorder, Persistent Depressive Disorder or some other type of anxiety or depression it is important to learn the lessons from that experience.  People who learn lessons from their issues seem to develop the skill of resiliency and they recover more quickly from future difficulties.  Below are some of the lessons that your depression may be able to teach you.

Sleep is more important than hard work.

One characteristic of depression is changes in sleep.  You may be sleeping far more than before or far less.  Not getting enough sleep puts you at risk to develop or worsen your depression.  Chronically getting too little sleep is one risk factor for episodes of depression and bipolar disorder.  If you’re losing sleep in order to work more or longer, that loss of sleep may impair your judgment and eventually undermine the progress you are making in your work.

You need to take care of yourself.

Just taking good care of yourself will not automatically prevent depression, but part of the process of recovering from depression is learning to take better care of yourself.  Depression teaches you the importance of good preventive self-care.

Taking care of you is not being selfish.

Another lesson depression can teach you is that in order to do for others you need to first take care of yourself.  You will find that taking care of yourself is not the same thing as being selfish.  Make self-care a priority to reduce the risks of future episodes of depression.

No one is perfect.

Depression can teach you that no one is perfect, there are plenty of improvement opportunities in every life.  Being too hard on yourself can easily put you in a negative frame of mind.  Trying to be perfect is setting yourself up for failure.  Learn to accept yourself just as you are.  Having this excepting frame of mind will help to inoculate you against future episodes of depression.

Sick people can do sick things.

Sometimes depression is a reaction to the hurtful things other people do to you.  Depression can teach you that other people can sometimes do very painful things.  Being a recipient of people’s negativity does not mean that you were at fault.  Sometimes people blame themselves for things that others have done when in fact that other person is a very sick person.  If someone has done something deliberately to harm you this does not mean you were at fault.

Stuff can’t make you happy.

It’s easy to slip into the trap of thinking if you just had more, bigger and prettier things, that then you would be happy.  Depression doesn’t care how much stuff you have.  Depression can teach you that experiences and relationships are far more important than material things.

Giving up on things can be a victory.

Persistence and dedication are virtues.  Sometimes we continue to try for far too long. Learning when to let go of something that is no longer making you happy is an important step in recovery.  Hanging on to lost causes is a sure way to increase your sadness and depression

It is OK to feel badly.

One lesson depression teaches is that sometimes it is OK to just feel the way you feel.  It is possible to feel badly and simply accept that feeling.  Just because something is hurtful, or painful does not mean that it needs to destroy you.

Feelings can be your friends.

Feelings, both good and bad can be your friends.  Feelings provide you with information.  They can tell you that things are good for you, or that they are bad for you.  Just because you feel badly you do not have to fall apart.

Your experiences made you who you are.

Living through feelings, good and bad, can be painful, but it ends up teaching you valuable lessons.  Your life experiences have made you who you are.  You can stay stuck in the past asking why things had to happen, or you can make peace with what happen and accept that this has become a part of who you are.

You need to measure your accomplishments, not the errors.

Most people have had many accomplishments.  Everyone who tries has some things that don’t work out the way they were planned.  If you only keep score of your errors you’ll run up a very large score.  When all you do was look at your faults it to be very discouraging.  Make sure you give yourself credit for the things you have accomplished.  It is likely that you accomplished far more things than you are aware of.  Depression likes to obscure your view of the positive things in life.

Friends will either buoy you up or pull you down.

Depression can tell you a lot about friends.  Some will help pull you up, others drag you down.  Let depression teach you about the characteristics of your friends.  Work on getting rid of friends who are negative.  A good support system can help you recover from any adversity.  Depression teaches you the value of good friends and encourages you to expand your support system.

What you tell yourself comes to be.

Words are powerful.  The things you tell yourself tend to come true.  Tell yourself that you can’t and you won’t be able to.  Tell yourself that somehow you will find a way to get past this and things go better.

How to really be grateful.

When everything is going well we forget to be grateful.  Depression teaches you to pay attention to the good things that happen in your life.  Sometimes we can become so discouraged by the things we don’t have, we lose the pleasure from the very many things we do have.  Recovery from depression can help you put all the parts of your life into proper perspective.

What lessons have you learned from your issues?

Take some time and consider what your personal issues may have taught you.  Have your life’s struggles make you stronger and more resilient or have you ignored the lessons they were trying to teach you?

Want to sign up for my mailing list?

Get the latest updates on my books, due out later this year by signing up for my newsletter. Newsletter subscribers will also be notified about live training opportunities and free or discounted books. Sign up here – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog check out my Google+ page or the Facebook author’s page, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books

Abundance.

Sunday Inspiration.   Post By David Joel Miller.

Abundance

Having Abundance

Abundance.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

“It is giving not receiving that creates an abundant life.”

“If you have love you have it all.”

“Abundance is receiving what you need not getting everything you want.”

Wanted to share some inspirational quotes with you.  Today seemed like a good time to do this. If any of these quotes strike a chord with you please share them.

Thankful?

Thankful?

Thankful

Thankful
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

“Sometimes the little things in life mean the most.”

― Ellen Hopkins, Glass

Wanted to share some inspirational quotes with you.  Sunday seemed like a good time to do this. If any of these quotes strike a chord with you please share them.

Thanksgiving Day.

Thanksgiving Day.

Post by David Joel Miller.

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Today is the traditional Thanksgiving Day celebration here in America. Mostly it is celebrated with lots of food, some family, and assorted other traditions.

For some people, this is a time to eat a lot and watch sports. Other people are planning their “Black Friday” Christmas shopping for tomorrow. A few of us old dinosaurs are remembering that today was created to think about all the things that we have to be grateful for and how this country almost didn’t make it, a couple of times.

Below are a few quotes that remind me of things to think about today.

“After a good dinner, one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations.”

― Oscar Wilde, A Woman of No Importance

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. ~John Fitzgerald Kennedy

An optimist is a person who starts a new diet on Thanksgiving Day. ~Irv Kupcinet

We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures. ~Thornton Wilder

None is more impoverished than the one who has no gratitude. Gratitude is a currency that we can mint for ourselves, and spend without fear of bankruptcy. ~Fred De Witt Van Amburgh

Thanksgiving is an emotional holiday. People travel thousands of miles to be with people they only see once a year. And then discover once a year is way too often. ~Johnny Carson

Wanted to share some inspirational quotes with you. But these were all I could find. Today seemed like a good time to do this. If any of these quotes strike a chord with you please share them.