Will I remember my Black out? Reader Question # 3

By David Joel Miller.

Will I remember my Blackout?

Reader Question # 3

No! If you truly had a blackout you will not remember it. If no memory is stored then there is nothing to recover. Think of it like playing a brand new blank DVD. Nothing recorded, so nothing to play.

Brownouts can happen also.

Sometimes bits and pieces of information were saved. It is often referred to as a brownout. That information may come back a little, bits by bit and piece by piece.

My guess, and it is only a guess, is that the brownouts happen when there was a trauma, like rape and the brain tried to protect you or when the levels of alcohol or other drugs in the blood stream fluctuated.

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Reader Questions

By David Joel Miller.

Slight change in format and procedure here. In the past, I was calling this feature “Morning Questions” but there needed to be a change in my writing schedule if that book in my brain was ever going to get down on paper or electrons. So the main blog post will be going up in the early AM.

I thought about calling this feature short questions or brief answers but sometimes they will be brief and other times not so brief. I settled on the title “Reader Questions.” My goal is to provide useful information and commentary while avoiding filling your inbox with excessive posts. These Reader Question posts will probably be infrequent unless there get to be more questions. Henceforth when a question or comment comes in or someone uses a search term that needs an answer you will see a Readers Question post.

Why do those with a low IQ act so immature?

By David Joel Miller.

Shouldn’t people with low IQ’s act more maturely?

I.Q. Tester

I.Q. Tester (Photo credit: Steve Snodgrass)

Morning Question #27

That immaturity is actually a part of how intelligence was first measured. People’s chronological age does not always match their mental age.

The original idea was to measure their mental age and compare that to their chronological age. People who though like a younger person were given a low IQ score.

IQ tests have been refined over the years and we know that IQ is in fact made up of many different factors. Some people are good at math and some are better with words. Since a lot of IQ tests consist of words on paper they are biased in favor of those who know more words.

Someone who has lived ten years should be in the 5th grade and should act like they were 10. But if they have a low IQ score, they score mentally like a 5-year-old and they should know what a 5-year-old knows, they probably will act like a 5-year-old also.

People also have what is called an emotional intelligence. Someone can be 30, score highly on an IQ test and still act and feel emotionally like they are a teen. We all know people who act like that.

Someone who has not yet learned the lessons necessary to think like a 30-year-old would also presumably act less mature emotionally than their chronological age.

There are standard development tasks that are customarily learned at a particular age. Failure to learn those tasks will affect the person’s mental and emotional behavior until learned.

Moral reasoning is also learned over time. We do not expect preschoolers to understand the difference between right and wrong in the same way adults should understand these differences. Unfortunately, right now it is hard to tell some politicians from preschoolers but that is another subject.

One place we do great damage to children and those with a low IQ is to expect them to act and behave like a much older person. It is easy to see that a small child cannot carry a heavy object until they grow up. It is harder to understand that a child can’t understand how to be more mature until they, in fact, become more mature and that takes time.

Yelling at a child to grow up and act their age does not, in fact, make them older or more emotionally mature. Pressuring young children to do things beyond their ability can do long-term damage to their emotions. We may need to set high expectations sometimes to motivate people but we should not punish them when our expectations turn out to be unrealistic.

The rub comes in most severely in the mentally challenged. Most of us can see that a child of five cannot play NFL football; they are not physically mature enough. But when it comes to the developmentally delayed it is harder to understand that while their bodies may look mature their understanding is still immature.

We should expect an emotionally immature person to act in an immature way and not upset ourselves when they can’t meet our unrealistic expectations.

So what do you think? Any comments on emotional maturity?

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Get the latest updates on my books, due out later this year by signing up for my newsletter. Newsletter subscribers will also be notified about live training opportunities and free or discounted books. Sign up here – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog check out my Google+ page or the Facebook author’s page, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books

Don’t most people abuse alcohol?

By David Joel Miller.

How common is alcohol abuse? Morning Question #26

No, most people in America do not currently abuse alcohol! Half the adults in America did not have an alcoholic drink in the last 30 days. According to Kinney (Loosening the Grip, 2009), the top ten percent heaviest drinkers in America consume 60% of all the alcohol. Add in the next ten percent and the twenty percent heaviest drinkers consume 80% of all the liquor we drink here in America.

Now, most heavy drinkers (Alcoholics) believe that most people drink like they do. Truth is most people in America do not drink that much. A few do most of the drinking.

But the amount consumed does not tell the whole story. You can drink once a year and still have an alcohol problem. It is not what you drink or when you drink that defines an alcohol use disorder.

One client told me he only drinks once a year on New Years. But the last three years, when he drank he ended up getting DUI’s or was arrested for other alcohol-related problems. Clearly, he had a problem.

As we noticed earlier drinking a lot on one occasion called Binge Drinking causes significant damage to the body. It also causes extra problems for senior citizens.

Much of the alcohol use disorders happen among the young. Most college students think everyone on campus drinks heavily and they are surprised to find out that most students do not drink alcoholically. As we age many people tend to cut back on their drinking, some stop altogether.

The worry is what negative consequences do they and others around them undergo before they learned to not abuse alcohol.

Want to sign up for my mailing list?

Get the latest updates on my books, due out later this year by signing up for my newsletter. Newsletter subscribers will also be notified about live training opportunities and free or discounted books. Sign up here – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog check out my Google+ page or the Facebook author’s page, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books

How much does marijuana effect memory?

By David Joel Miller.

Marijuana affects memory?

Morning Question #25.

On average marijuana users need twice as many repetitions to learn the material as non-smokers. But they usually don’t care enough to study twice as long.

See the posts on State Dependent Learning and How does marijuana effect memory.    

Want to sign up for my mailing list?

Get the latest updates on my books, due out later this year by signing up for my newsletter. Newsletter subscribers will also be notified about live training opportunities and free or discounted books. Sign up here – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog check out my Google+ page or the Facebook author’s page, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books

What does “an expectation not an exception” mean when applied to co-occurring disorders?

By David Joel Miller.

Are Co-occurring disorders to be expected? – Morning Question #24

DSM-4

Light reading

Most substance abusers also have some form of mental illness. The two are seen together so often we need to begin by assuming the client could have both and then assess as if both disorders were present. Many substance users had the mental illness before they began using drugs or alcohol. Depression, Bipolar Disorder, and Anxiety are all common among those with an addiction.

People who use and abuse substances are at risk of developing mental health issues as a result of the using experience.

Substances can also alter the brain, resulting in mental illnesses while under the influence, while withdrawing or after use. Mental illnesses that are the result of drug or alcohol use are called drug-induced illnesses.

Anyone who works with the mentally ill or substance abusers should expect that they will see both of these problems and others on a frequent basis.

Want to sign up for my mailing list?

Get the latest updates on my books, due out later this year by signing up for my newsletter. Newsletter subscribers will also be notified about live training opportunities and free or discounted books. Sign up here – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog check out my Google+ page or the Facebook author’s page, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books

Does Depression go away suddenly if you have Bipolar Disorder?

By David Joel Miller.

Can people with Bipolar Disorder have a sudden remission of their depression?

Morning Question #23

YES, YES and More YES. It is common for people with Bipolar Disorder to rebound suddenly from a depressive episode. Taking antidepressants can cause that. So can a lack of sleep. Most likely these sudden recoveries for depression will not take you to “normal” whatever that is. They propel the bipolar person into Mania or at least Hypomania. I suspect that lots of other things can cause that leap from depression.

For more on Bipolar Cyclothymia, Mania or Hyperthymic personality see the categories to the right or check out the blog post – List of Bipolar related posts.  

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse and Co-occurring disorders see the about the author page. For information about my other writing work beyond this blog, there is also a Facebook authors page, in its infancy, up under David Joel Miller. Posts to the “books, trainings and classes” category will tell you about those activities. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com. Thanks to all who read this blog.

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