4 Ethical Loopholes strangle therapists

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Ethical loopholes strangle.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

4 Ethical Loopholes Strangle Therapists – Part 1.

Therapists who violate codes of ethics harm clients; they also may lose their licenses or ruin their carriers. Often these ethical breaches start with thinking that there might be sometimes when it is OK to make an exception to an ethical standard.

Not following ethical guidelines can harm clients. Making exceptions to ethical codes can be fatal flaws.

Therapists are taught codes of ethics in school. We take exams that include questions on laws and ethics or may even need to take a separate law and ethics exam. Every few years most of us have to take a refresher course in law and ethics. Still, people violate these guidelines. Why?

Somewhere down the line, some professionals start looking for loopholes, exceptions to those ethical requirements. When they do this, put their head through that ethical loophole, too often they can get strangled and lose their licenses or lose the trust of their clients.

Four ethical violations seem to create the most problems for clients and therapists. Most of these violations start with the professional think that while this rule is a good one there might be times when someone, not them of course, but another therapist, might do this and that would be OK. Once you have been able to picture a time when there might be an exception to this ethical rule it is likely that you will cross that boundary and try to put your head through that loophole.

Most therapists think immediately about the ethical standard that says no sex with clients. They know that if you think that might EVER be OK then you are at risk to do it. While this is huge for therapists, it may not be the ethical violation that harms the client the most.

Here are the Big 4 ethical violations in their order of harm to the client

1. Not keeping what clients say confidential.

When I get away from other professionals, out in the community this comes up more than I thought it would. Look at the list of top posts on this blog. Month after month people search for information about what is and is not kept confidential. Unfortunately, I also hear too many stories about how a therapist told that clients story somewhere, someone recognized them from the story and this has hurt them when a family member, friend or boss found out.

Knowing that the way counseling helps is because of the relationship and that strict confidentiality is fundamental to that confidentiality, how do so many professionals cross that line?

The first stretch through this loophole often happens innocently. Here is a HYPOTHETICAL example.

The therapist is somewhere and is asked about a particular mental health disorder. “Is there any treatment for Trichotillomania?”

“Sure there is, the therapist says. “I saw a client recently with Trichotillomania. She has suffered a trauma and began pulling out her hair uncontrollably, almost unconsciously. I treated her using treatment “X” and she got better.”

So far so good. But the therapist wants to sound great, impress this person and get more referrals. He or she is thinking maybe I should become the authority on treating trichotillomania in this town. So they go on to tell more.

This was a tough case you know. Her family is very influential in this town. Her father is a prominent politician in this town and he did not want this getting out in his district or it might affect his reelection campaign. That district on the “X” side of town is awful conservative.

Is there a problem now? Sure there is. This is way too much information and has identified that client to anyone who thinks about this for over 5 seconds.

One little story – what harm?

But the next time the story gets more elaborate and before long this clinician is talking about their clients all over. They even decide to warn their church group about that sexual offender that has moved in on the same block as the church. What harm can there be in helping people keep their child safe?

The harm comes first because they have violated that client’s trust and eventually someone will find out and then it turns major. The harm may also include attacks on that client. Sometimes that registered sex offender, the one that the counselor warned people about, what he did was when he was 18 he had sex with his 17-year-old girlfriend and her parents pressed charges. This couple since has gotten married but he could still turn up on a list of sexual offenders.

If this therapist has a private practice and people find out about this they may just stop going to see them. But if the clients are low-income and have to go to a government-funded clinic they may not be allowed to change therapists. They may just stop coming and they will be counted, not as victims of the system but as treatment failures and drop-outs.

You would think a profession like counseling would police itself. Not usually. The complaint in this situation is most effective if it comes from the client. But then the client already afraid because of the harm done to them, that registered sex offender or Muslim may be getting death threats at this point, probably just wants to escape the system.

Other professionals may hesitate to report this. It is their word against the others. Whistleblowers can and do get punished. Also because this happened to a client there may be minimal ways that this can be reported by another counselor without violating this client’s confidentiality again. All these are ethical and practical concerns.

Oh my! I am past 900 words and have only talked about one of four ways ethical boundary violations hurt clients.

One caution here – Ethical guidelines are just that “Guidelines” not hard and fast rules. So any professional, at any point, is in danger and may have a problem with something. What I am talking about here are the big problems and the professionals who repeatedly break these ethical principles.

In the future, I want to talk about the other ethical problems also. My plan is to talk about one of these problems each Friday for the next three weeks. This post was mainly aimed at counselors and would be counselors, but then I thought others might be interested in the ethical dilemmas we confront.

Here are ethical issues number two, three and four.

2. Thinking that it is OK to party a little. If you just chip on the weekends how can that hurt clients?

3. Dual Relationships, hiring clients to work for you, getting them to loan you money or loaning them money, especially getting into investments together.

4. Falling in love and getting into sexual relationships with clients. We all want to believe in Snow White and Prince Charming but if a therapist falls in love with a client who came to him with a mental illness, this may turn out more like a sexual predator than a prince.

Let’s look at these three problems over the next three weeks.

Since we are over on words today I will skip the links to others stuff, you know where to find me. Check the categories to the right for more on other mental health and substance abuse issues.

David Joel Miller, LMFT, LPCC

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

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Will the Counselor, therapist, psychologist keep your secret or tell?

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Keeping your secrets?
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Just how confidential is confidentiality.

Just what is confidential and what is not is a major concern to clients in mental health treatment. I have written several posts in the past on this subject but from the number of searches on this subject, we need to talk some more about this. Links to some of the past posts are at the end of this post.

Confidentiality and its cousin privilege, are legal as well as ethical concepts.  Laws can vary greatly from place to place. Check in the jurisdiction you live in and ask the person you are seeing if you have concerns about this.

We spend a lot of time on these issues in graduate school. We are supposed to explain this to clients when we first see them. Beginning counselors tend to spend a lot of time telling new clients more than most clients want to know. After a few years of doing therapy, the amount the client gets told declines and sometimes slips below the minimum the client needs. If your provider has said less than you need to know please ask.

Please remember I am talking about this from a counselor’s point of view, how we try to meet our legal and ethical responsibilities in practice. For the law in this, you should consult a lawyer.

Here are the general rules.

Everything you tell your therapist-counselor is confidential UNLESS it falls into a required or permitted exception.

1. Danger to self is reportable.

If you are eminently suicidal we can break confidentiality to keep the client alive. We are supposed to do this whether we want to or not. In practice, it is a judgment call whether the client has thoughts but does not intend to carry through or if they plan to kill themselves soon. Our response may vary depending on the circumstances.

2. Danger to others gets reported.

If you say you intend to kill someone in the future this gets reported. Past crimes are generally not reportable unless they fall under one of the other exceptions. Throwing a book at your sister is not a danger to others.

3. Child abuse, abuse of an elderly or disabled person needs reporting.

Generally, all abuse of a child gets reported if the provider has a reason to suspect the child is being abused. The counselor is not responsible for investigating, only to report to authorities. Someone who murdered a child would have committed child abuse and this past crime could be a mandated report in some places.

4. If the counselor needs to consult with another professional.

In this case, they tell the minimum they need to get the answers they need. They might talk to another professional about your treatment, to a lawyer about what is reportable or to a billing person. They can “use” the information you give them to help in your treatment and their getting paid for providing it, but they are not supposed to “disclose” that information to people who do not need to know. Counselors sometimes call their lawyers to find out what they need to keep confidential and what they need to disclose.

5. If you are Gravely Disabled they need to report to get you help.

If the client can’t feed themselves or use clothing and shelter the counselor needs to call someone and get this person help.

6. You sue your counselor and they can talk about treating you.

If you sue your counselor for doing a bad job they get to introduce your records and prove what you said and why they did what they did.

7. If you introduce your mental status into a court proceeding they will be required to tell things.

Once you use your mental illness as a defense in court for something you are charged with all your mental health records may come out.

8. You are not the client and are not paying for the counseling.

If you are sent for a court-ordered examination, a child protective service interview or other assessment paid for by someone else you will probably be asked to sign a release of information so that the person paying for the services can see what happened.

No release and there will be no treatment. Once you sign that release the person who is paying or who ordered the assessment and or treatment gets reports. You can revoke this sometimes, but not all the time, and what has been disclosed cannot, of course, be taken back and remade confidential.

9. You are a collateral person in a session.

If you go with your partner or child and they are the person being treated you may not be getting any confidentiality on what you say. You should ask about this before you stay things and then want them kept secret.

10. A court subpoenas your records.

This gets problematic. The counselor or therapist will try to keep some things confidential by asserting privilege but that is up to the lawyers and the judge. If this is a worry to you talk to your lawyer before you see the counselor and see if there is a chance this will come up in court.

One last thought. There are some clients who come for therapy and talk extensively about how guilty they feel about past crimes and how they want to change. They don’t usually give all the details of the crimes. There are others who seem to want to brag about what great criminals they are and they don’t want to change. The ones who don’t want to change frequently say things that end up needing to be disclosed.

Facing the things you have done wrong and trying to change is a huge part of recovery.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Must psychologist report patient planning a crime

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

More about when the therapist breaks confidentiality Reader Question #1

Please with crime scene tape

Do therapists have to report a crime?
Picture courtesy of pixabay

Most of the time Therapist, counselors and psychologists do not report past crimes. If the crime may occur in the future, then we have a problem. How does the treating professional balance the duty to protect the public with the need to maintain a trusting relationship with the client?

In past posts, I talked about some of the standard exceptions to confidentiality. Things like child abuse or an intent to harm themselves or others. If the client tells me about a plan, to harm or otherwise abuse a child, or kill their partner and them themselves, I feel both ethically and legally bound to intervene and try to stop this. How I go about intervening may be a matter of my best “clinical judgment.”

But this planning a crime issue, that is tricky.

One thing every professional should do is have a place they can go to for legal and ethical advice. This is one of the reasons I am a member of both CALPCC (California Associations for Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors) and CAMFT (California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists.) Professional associations often offer services to answer or refer you to answers for ethical and legal questions. CAMFT has lawyers on staff who can answer these kinds of questions if you are a member.

So a counselor who is presented with this situation may well consult with a legal or ethical adviser. While doing this consultation they would use the minimum amount of information needed to get an answer. They should not give the clients name or identifying info but only the nature of the crime the client says they might commit and then ask if they legally or ethically need to make any kind of report.

I mentioned also that it matters who is paying this counselor. If you go to a government psychologist and are planning on cheating disability by lying about your symptoms, that professional is working for the government and will report your effort as fraud. The point of the interview is to see if you are disabled. Even if your treating clinician does not disclose something you said they will not lie by leaving out things that would affect the decision someone else is making.

So what kinds of crimes can I think of that might need to be reported?

If my client was thinking of burning down a building or planting a bomb, I might need to report that and warn people near that building because of the high risk that someone would be hurt. If they were planning to set a fire and they shoot first responders, I feel that this is absolutely reportable.

We do encourage clients to talk with us about anything and everything so we can help them and I would want to try to help my client find other ways to accomplish their goals without committing a crime.

Generally, financial type crimes, writing bad checks or cheating on your taxes, we don’t have to report clients for that. But we do want to work with them on why that lifestyle may lead to worse things. What a counselor should not do is help the client plan ways to get away with a crime.

One last exception to confidentiality no one ever seems to talk about is if the client is a terrorist. If they are plotting a terrorist attack, even if no person is likely to be harmed, the treating professional may be required to divulge that information. Homeland security can require treating professionals to disclose certain things.

But honestly this is not a big problem for counselors; suicide bombers probably do not see therapists. Around here we aren’t likely to hear about any Homeland security related issues. There are not many terrorist attacks on cattle feedlots or vegetable growers.

Yes, I live in California, but remember that a large part of this state is a long way from the ocean.

Not sure that really answered the question, but I know that the worry about how much to tell and how much you need to hold back from your counselor is on a lot of clients mind. If you can’t trust your therapist it is hard for them to be able to help you.

When in doubt ask the person you are seeing and judge by their answer if they will try to help you while staying inside the law and ethical guidelines.

This has been a general discussion of legal and ethical issues involved in a client and counselor discussing the client’s plan to commit a crime. Remember I am a counselor, not a lawyer and legal issues vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. For your specific situation, you may need to talk to a lawyer.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

How does my therapist know that? Isn’t counseling confidential?

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Is counseling confidential?
Picture courtesy of pixabay.

Did my last therapist tell?

This comes up a lot when people move from provider to provider. It especially happens when you see multiple people in the same agency. No not everything you told your old therapist will be kept secret from your new one. WHY?

Laws about confidentiality make a distinction between “Use” and “Disclosure” of information. If you are in the hospital anyone who is treating you needs to be able to look at your record and see what medications you are on, what procedures you have had and what allergies you may have. Anyone who treats you in the future at that agency probably has the right to look at your old record and see what was done to you. The same applies to psychotherapy.

Everyone at the hospital does not get to look at anyone’s medical record just because they want to see it. The only reason to access a medical record should be for the purpose of treatment. People have gotten fired for looking up someone’s medical record just because they were curious. Even looking in medical records to see if a famous or infamous person was treated at your hospital can get you fired. But if you are treating a client you may need to know what is in their record.

Psychotherapists do and can share records and that is considered “use” not “disclosure.” Laws about confidentiality primarily relate to disclosure. Some of this has to do with law, for that see a lawyer. As a therapist though, I find this is an important issue to many of my clients and they need to understand how our system works.

It is considered good practice to separate psychotherapy notes from your general medical file. Everyone who treats you in the emergency room for an accident does not need to know about your marital problems.

We also don’t need a list of the names you or your spouse call each other. What the counselor wants to know is that you two are having conflicts and that you resort to name calling with each other rather than problem-solving. One or two examples will suffice here. Long transcripts of the argument might be interesting in a movie script but they don’t need to be in psychotherapy notes.

Clients sometimes move from therapist to therapist. Sometimes clients want a new counselor, some therapists are known to “fire” clients for a variety of reasons. Ethically we should suggest a change of provider if we feel that we are not able to help a client. If your counselor retires, you may be assigned a new one.

When the client changes therapist, we do not, as a rule, start a new file. Would you want to go through all those tests and lab work every time you saw a different doctor? Same with taking a life history. It should be in your chart. The new provider should review your chart so they should have some knowledge of what your last therapist was treating you for and why.

Charts are needed to provide continuity of care as well as other reasons. Clients have told me they resent that the new therapist knows things they had not told them. They probably read this in the chart though they may have been briefed on the case by the last provider also. If the file moved to a new agency there probably was a release of information but at the same agency, the old paperwork still applies.

Personally, I like to meet the client first and form my own opinion about them, then review the chart. The risk is that the client will have to tell me something they just told the other counselor last week. The benefit is that in telling me again they may say something they did not say last time or I may ask a different question. A fresh set of eyes can sometimes see something new.

More than once after doing a new assessment I looked at the file and can see why the last counselor came up with the diagnosis they did, but having new facts I don’t necessarily agree with that opinion.

So yes, the new therapist may know something you did not tell them. That they were filled in by your previous provider is not a violation of confidentiality. Did you really want to have to retell your whole life history to a new person before getting down to the work of solving life’s problems?

The bigger question is why you would want to hide things from the therapist you are seeing now?  They will have trouble helping you if you don’t tell them what the situation really is.

The most important person for you to trust and get honest with is you. Some clients hide things from their counselor because they don’t want to face the fact that they have a particular problem.

The results of counseling are mostly about the relationship. We try to spend time up front getting to know clients and building trust. Some clients have more trust issues than others. If you are not sure you trust your therapist, ask them questions. The names of their kids and their spouse are not important but their views on how to raise a child or have a good relationship might matter to you.

You should be able to rely on your provider to maintaining your confidentiality and not disclosing your information to someone who has no reason to know. Don’t expect one doctor or therapist to try to hide your symptoms from another professional who is treating you.

The bottom line? If you want help in recovering from your issues, whatever they are, you need to get honest with yourself and your counselor or find a provider you feel you can trust.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Should I tell my therapist about Porn? Morning Question #21

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Should he tell?
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Talk to the counselor about porn?

Why? I would think they already know about it. The better question is – are you or your partner having a problem with porn? If this is something that is causing you problems then yes, by all means, tell the counselor about it.

Another reason to disclose the use of porn is if you and your partner are having relationship problems. Even if one partner does not think the porn is a problem the other partner may. Viewing sexually explicit materials can create a false sense of reality. Internet porn is about pixels, not people. So if one partner in a relationship looks at porn and there are problems, sexual or otherwise, between the two of you, that porn watching activity is very relevant to individual and couples counseling.

Don’t be afraid or ashamed to talk about anything relevant to your problem. If you are having relationship issues of any kind then what you see portrayed as relationships in any media is relevant. If your therapist is unable to talk with you about this or is excessively moralistic or judgmental, then you just might have the wrong therapist for you.  See also Counseling as a novel relationship and posts about What the counselor can and can’t tell. The post about threesomes was written about bringing an addiction into your relationship but it is very relevant about porn or internet addictions also.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Do therapists have to report a crime?

By David Joel Miller.

Do therapists have to report a crime?
Picture courtesy of pixabay

Do counselors report crimes? Morning Question #10

The general answer is NO! The more you can talk to a therapist about the more likely you will be helped to change your behavior. Therapists have a legal and ethical duty to NOT repeat what you say. Any exceptions to that rule are determined by law. See my posts on “How Much Should You Tell a Therapist?” or “Why pay a therapist when you can just talk to a friend?

So could a government somewhere make a law that the therapist had to report a crime? Sure could.

There are laws in many places that protect patient and psychotherapists communication, very similar to doctor and patient privilege. The relationship between a patient and a psychotherapist is held to be special, like that between a person and a religious priest.

The principle exceptions to not having to report crimes are, abuse of children, the elderly and the disabled, (see – Does abuse of seniors and the elderly get reported?), and if you are suicidal or plan to kill someone else. Also if you are being investigated by homeland security we may have to report. As long as homeland security confines their investigations to known terrorists I am OK with this, as it falls under that duty to protect other intended victims. Some therapists have worried that this could be interpreted as needing information of a particular religion or political party and we would mostly be opposed to that sort of reporting.

Short answer: past crimes usually do not get reported, future and ongoing crimes like abuse or a plan to kill probably will be reported.

See also – How much should you tell a therapist?

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.