O.C.D. or Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder?

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

What is the difference between OCD and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder?

Obsession

Obsession.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

There are two different mental disorders that share the OCD designation. It seems odd that we have two disorders that share the OCD part of their labels. The way I read the DSM they are rather different disorders.

The result of this dual use of the OCD label is that the two conditions may be getting confused and that people with Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder may not be getting diagnosed or treated the way they should be.

People with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder have high levels of anxiety and they have rituals they feel compelled to perform that relieve the anxiety.

Think of obsession as not being able to stop thinking about something, in the case of OCD this thing they can’t stop thinking about is usually connected to some perceived danger. This is beyond just being over-anxious about a real danger. Like PTSD there are images that keep popping into the head. Having these thoughts upsets the person. The person with OCD knows these are their own thoughts and that the thoughts are excessive.

The compulsive part has to do with the inability to withstand the thought and the need to do something to relieve the tension. These obsessions are not things like avoiding the alligator, which might keep you safe. They involve things like washing of hands over and over, praying for a long period of time repeating phrases or counting.

The description of OCD reminds me of impulse control disorders like gambling or addiction and has some similarities to over eating disorders.

OCD is a more generalized condition than what you might see in someone who has difficulty controlling only one obsession or compulsion as in an alcoholic who keeps thinking about drinking until the give in and drink. In OCD the compulsions don’t have that direct a relationship.

That is a very over brief description of OCD from the DSM-4-TR.

For more on OCD and its treatment, I would refer you to another site here on WordPress called ocdtalk.

How is OCD different from Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder?

This description of Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder is taken from the proposal for the DSM-5 since it will become final very soon and Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder is one of the personality disorders that the DSM-5 kept.

Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder involves a SIGNIFICANT impairment in self-functioning. Someone with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder does not just have a few symptoms about one thing but that is the way they are all the time.

Someone with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder gets their self-worth, their sense of purpose in life from their work or productivity. They are compelled to do something all the time. They have overly high rigid standards and are “inflexible” about meeting these standards. This sounds like that old “black and white thinking” to me.

Someone with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder is overly moralistic or conscientious. As a result of these excessive standards, they may be unable to complete projects unless they can be done “correctly” or perfectly.

People with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder lack empathy for others and will put work or moral standards before relationships.

If you are not perfect the person with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder will not want you for a friend. If you think you are perfect then you may well have Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder or another mental illness.

Other traits of a person with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder include rigid-compulsive perfectionism and negative “affect.” Meaning they are negative about everything all the time.

They person with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder is also likely to practice “perseveration” meaning they can’t let something go. They will keep trying to get something just right even after it no longer matters.

I get the picture here of someone who is very “puritanical.” I believe sitcoms call them “anal retentive.”

People with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder do not end up in treatment very often, at least not for the personality disorder, but they do drive others around them to therapy.

Did that explain the difference? Feel free to leave a comment. I always feel compelled to reply.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Advertisements

Hoarding – Could the brains of hoarders really be different?

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Brain

Memory.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Hoarding is about to become a recognized mental illness.

Hoarders just can’t make decisions when it comes to their own stuff. They don’t have trouble evaluating other people’s things, just their own, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Health.

There has been a lot more publicity about this than in times past but I have to believe that there have always been hoarders. People who lived through the “Great Depression” (1929 not 2008) tended to keep lots of stuff because if you ran out of wire or nails there might not be money to buy more. That is not the sort of saving that gets diagnosed as hoarding.

There seems to be something uniquely different about the way the mind of a hoarder works. Even when outsiders come in and reorganize the place, dispose of the garbage, the problem is not solved. The hoarder faced with new stuff, today’s mail or leftover napkins and condiment packets from fast food, can’t make a decision about what to keep and what to save. The result is they keep everything.

Proposed for inclusion in the new DSM-5 the new “Hoarding Disorder” is a fairly straightforward diagnose with only a few characteristics needed to make the diagnosis.

The characteristics needed, in my oversimplified explanation of this one are:

1. Can’t bear to throw things away whether they are worth saving or not.

2. They feel like they must keep it and get upset if forced to part with the item.

3. As a result of the hoarding, they run out of room and can’t use parts of their home for what it should be used for.

4. Hoarding is causing them problems with job, friends, making them unhappy or creating an unsafe situation.

5. No other reason, medical etc., for this behavior is found

6. This is not caused by another mental illness like depression or anxiety etc.

Points one to three are what makes this disorder different and points four to six are standard conditions for almost all diagnosis to look for other possibilities and make sure this really is a problem before making the diagnosis.

There appear to be two types of hoarders.

Those who are indiscriminate collectors and go out of their way to get new stuff, buying, stealing and scavenging things even when they have no use for the item.

Those hoarders who do not go out of their way to get things but can’t figure out what to keep and what to toss after they get things.

Whichever type of hoarder you or a person close to you are, the hoarder needs help. Cleaning out a hoarder’s collection is a short-term temporary fix. Hoarders need help from a profession to change their thinking or the whole process of accumulating just keeps repeating its self.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.