Does Multiple Personality Disorder really exist?

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

personality disorder

What Causes DID Disorder?
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Are Multiple Personality Disorder, Manic-Depressive Disorder, and Addiction real illnesses?

There have been some books, articles and blog posts recently saying that many things we are calling illness either do not exist or if they do exist they are not really illnesses but choices people make.

Some of the arguments these people are making seem to have some merit on the face, but when I look deeper there are some serious flaws in this kind of reasoning. All good lies have some truth in them and so these misconceptions about illnesses take some sorting out. Most of these efforts to deny the existence of a particular illness are cases of – if I do not believe in this it can’t hurt me.

Let’s look at some examples of ways people try to deny the existence of mental disorders.

1. Change the name and the illness ceases to exist – Denial one.

“There is no such thing as Consumption. When people believed in consumption they got it and died. No one gets it now because we know it does not exist.”

You buying that?

Consumption is the old name for Tuberculosis. Yes, people still get T. B. and die from it. We do have medication to treat it, but if you take no meds, you still can die from this illness. Changing the name did not erase the disease.

What about Manic-Depressive Disorder? No such thing right?

Well, we changed the name of that one to Bipolar Disorder so in that sense there is no such thing as Manic Depressive Disease. No difference really in the condition. Still, a serious illness and still needs treating, but not in the strict literal sense, there is no such thing as Manic Depressive disorder anymore at least not in the DSM.

Which brings us to Multiple Personality Disorder.

The name misled a lot of people into thinking that everyone who had this issue would look like Sybil.  Truth is that there are lots of variations. The new name is “Dissociative Identity Disorder” so while technically, semantically, Multiple Personality Disorder no longer exists, there are still millions of people living with exactly these symptoms; we just call this condition by a new name.

Watch for an upcoming post on Dissociation Disorders. (Yes, there are more than one of these creatures.)

2. Second denial – There is no such thing as mental illness.

The argument runs – mental illness is not a “real disease” these are just people who think or behave differently from the rest of us and we want to force them to act and think like the rest of us.

A lot was made of this a few years back. Again in a strictly semantically way, this has some truth to it. Just enough truth to be misleading.

One definition of illness or disease is a process of an organism, bacteria or virus, invading the body and damaging cells. The proponents of this “no mental illness” idea argued that if mental illness was a real illness we should be able to find the bug that caused it and a drug that removed this infection from the body.

Newer research on the brain is chipping away at this one. There are lots of changes that nerve cells undergo that cause a change in functioning. Thoughts and traumatic experiences can change the wiring and the chemistry of the brain.

Most mental issues are correctly referred to as “disorders” not technically diseases. The specific definition of a disorder is essentially something that causes you a thinking, feeling, or behavioral issue.

So if the emotional, mental or behavior problem cause you to have impairment in Social functioning, (You can’t get along with family and or friends) occupational functioning (the ability to hold a job) of subjective distress (You say it bothers you) then we diagnose it as a mental disorder. The DSM-5 adds “other important area of functioning” I am still not sure what all that might be but if we find that we can give you the diagnosis also.

So while there does not appear to be any Dissociative Disorder germ, I still think that the effects of trauma can alter your emotions sufficiently that we can say you have a disorder.

3. Denial three – I do not believe in Dissociative Disorders so they do not exist.

I take this to be the funniest reason of all to pretend that disorders do not exist. Still, some people cling to the notion that there was no evolution or that the sun does, in fact, revolve around the earth.

Personally, I have taken to believing that Arizona does not exist. California just runs all the way to New Mexico. Those of you that think you live in Arizona knock that foolishness off and start sending your taxes my way.

People have denied the existence of addiction for years saying those people just chose to be that way. Some of them say the same thing about schizophrenia. Now the medical people are saying almost all medications including prescribed ones can cause tolerance and withdrawal so they all met the old definition for addiction.

We are getting around this one by elimination addiction – it is no more. All of you that thought you knew someone with an addiction you were wrong – there is no such thing as addiction – We will, however, be treating a lot of people next year for substance use disorders and the key characteristic of that disorder will be a loss of control over their use of a substance.

See how this works.

4. Straw man argument.

The way this one goes is: When you talk about Multiple Personality Disorder or Dissociative Disorder what you really mean is –

They then proceed to spend the rest of their post arguing about things that you never said and wouldn’t have said, but it makes them feel better to win an argument even if they need to misrepresent what you think to win one.

Oh, my – another long post. So in the future let’s talk some more about all the things that we have been learning about stress, trauma, and dissociation.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

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Why are so many children being diagnosed Bipolar?

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Person with masks

Bipolar.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Early Onset Bipolar Disorder.

Bipolar diagnoses in children have increased 40 fold in the ten-year period from 2000 to 2010.

What is behind the increasing number of children and teens who are being diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder?

We are learning more about the risk factors for early onset all the time. Still, as we learn about what may be causing this increase in the number of cases of early onset Bipolar Disorder, the picture of how to treat or prevent early life Bipolar Disorder is getting less clear.

If we could detect symptoms of Bipolar Disorder early, presumably we should be able to treat those symptoms and reduce the incidence of Bipolar Disorder or at least reduce the severity of the disorder.

Unfortunately, there is often a lag of ten years or more from the first symptoms until the child has a manic or hypomanic episode that qualifies them for a diagnosis of Bipolar.

I have written in past blog posts about how many of the things that cause people to think of someone as Bipolar are in fact not necessarily symptoms of the disorder. Being moody does not make you Bipolar.

What does help define the Bipolar condition is the ability to sleep only a few or no hours per night and still have plenty of energy. That along with excessive energy, being driven to do things and being impulsive are the hallmark features of Bipolar Disorder.

Here are some of the possible causes for the increasing number of Bipolar diagnoses in children.

1. Taking Stimulant ADHD meds or antidepressants can set off a manic or hypomanic episode.

One huge risk factor for developing a Manic or hypomanic episode, the key factor in a Bipolar Disorder diagnosis is having taken either a stimulant or antidepressant medication.

Having been treated with a stimulant ADHD med seems to correlate with developing mania. Not all children treated for ADHD develop Bipolar and not all people with a Bipolar Disorder diagnosis were first diagnosed with ADHD but the overlap is disturbing.

In one study of adolescents with Bipolar Disorder, 98% had been diagnosed with ADHD and treated with stimulant meds first.

This points to the need for psychiatric diagnosis to be reviewed by psychiatrists and in children by a child psychiatrist.

2. Abusing substances increases the risk of developing Bipolar disorder.

Over 40 % of children who receive the Bipolar Disorder diagnosis have been abusing substances. In their lifetime, 60% of all people with Bipolar Disorder will develop a substance use disorder.

This is not limited to just stimulant drugs. There is a high overlap between Bipolar Disorder and alcohol abuse as well as developing problems with excessive use of Marijuana.

3. Being the victim of physical or sexual abuse or neglect.

Abuse or neglect increases the risk of developing Bipolar disorder. This also accounts for the difficulty in many cases of distinguishing between Bipolar disorder and Borderline Personality Disorder. It is possible for people to have both illnesses.

There is also an overlap between trauma induced problems, stress disorders like PTSD, dissociation and the like and Bipolar Disorder. We would like to think the boundaries between genetic disorders and those that are the result of life experiences were easy to find. In practice those lines are blurry.

4. Poor diet and lack of exercise are risk factors for Bipolar Disorder.

Poor diet, particularly diets deficient in some vitamins and minerals can increase the risk of getting a Bipolar diagnosis. Hard here to tell which came first. People with depression or mania, both symptoms of Bipolar Disorder neglect their diet. Poor diet increases the risk and around the circle goes.

Lack of adequate exercise has resulted in an explosion in weight-related problems. There is the thought that this lack of exercise and poor diet is also contributing to the increased prevalence of Bipolar Disorder.

5. Genetics is a Bipolar Disorder risk factor.

If you have one parent with Bipolar Disorder the risk you will develop Bipolar Disorder is 33%. Two parents with Bipolar Disorder and the risk goes up to 70%.  Add to that the difficulty that parents who have an emotional problem have in parenting and you can see how the interplay of genetics and environment increase the risk dramatically of your grow up with a Bipolar, substance abusing parent.

6.  A changing environment may make Bipolar Disorder more noticeable.

Some of the characteristics that we today call Bipolar Disorder would have had survival benefits in the past. Fast processing speed and jumping to conclusions might save your life in the woods but can get you into trouble in the classroom.

People with milder varieties of bipolar disorder enjoy the hypomania – for a while. Even full-on Mania can be fun until those impulsive decisions get you into trouble. Bipolar Disorders are often associated with overspending, excessive sexual activity, and substance abuse. All things that damage relationships and can cost you your job.

The increase in children receiving the diagnosis of Bipolar disorder will continue to result in more adults with those labels as these early life cases age. If your child is having problems consider family therapy to help everyone find simple solutions to these problems.

If you or someone you know has Bipolar Disorder or another emotional problem that might look like Bipolar Disorder consider getting help. Therapy can be effective in helping you to learn how to control your symptoms. Medication can also be useful in keeping your moods within bounds.

People can and do recover from the symptoms we call Bipolar Disorder.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

 

Why people are reading counselorssoapbox.com

Counselorssoapbox.com

Why people are reading counselorssoapbox.com

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

For the last 30 days here are the top posts that brought people to counselorssoapbox .com.

In case you missed some of these top posts the links are included.

How much should you tell a therapist?

Levels or types of Borderline Personality Disorder

Do therapists have to report a crime?

Do people really forget what happened when drinking? – Blackouts

Which border is Borderline Intellectual Functioning on?

Are you a Parentified Child?

Do therapists like, fall in love with their clients? Why don’t they tell them?

Reasons Counselors and Therapists Lose Licenses

About the Author – David Joel Miller

Hyperthymia, Hyperthymic Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Top counselorssoapbox.com posts for Sept 2013

Counselorssoapbox.com

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Well, the month is not quite over but here they are the most read posts on counselorssoapbox.com for the last 30 days, just in case you missed one.

How much should you tell a therapist?                     

Levels or types of Borderline Personality Disorder               

Do therapists have to report a crime?            

Hyperthymia, Hyperthymic Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder                   

Do people really forget what happened when drinking? – Blackouts                       

Which border is Borderline Intellectual Functioning on?                  

Reasons Counselors and Therapists Lose Licenses               

Are you Hyperthymic?                      

6 ways to recover from Complex Trauma or Complex PTSD                       

Is nicotine a stimulant or a depressant?                     

Do therapists like, fall in love with their clients? Why don’t they tell them?           

Can you force a teenager to go for therapy? 

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Top 10 counselorssoapbox.com posts

Counselorssoapbox.com

Top 10 counselorssoapbox.com mental health posts.

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Just in case you missed one of these. Here are the top 10 counselorssoapbox.com blog posts for the month of August.

How much should you tell a therapist?                     

Do therapists have to report a crime?            

Levels or types of Borderline Personality Disorder               

Do people really forget what happened when drinking? – blackouts                       

Hyperthymia, Hyperthymic Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder                   

Are you Hyperthymic?                      

Which border is Borderline Intellectual Functioning on?                  

Do therapists tell parents what kids say?                   

Reasons Counselors and Therapists Lose Licenses               

Can you force a teenager to go for therapy? 

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Why your diagnosis does not fit

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Medical record

Diagnosis.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.com

Why do they keep changing my mental health diagnosis?

If you or someone you know has a mental health diagnosis you might be wondering why the information you get is so inconsistent. You read about your diagnoses somewhere and yes you have some of those symptoms some of the time but there may be other symptoms you do not think you have had ever.

Then you see another professional and they give you a new diagnosis. Keep getting treatment and the diagnosis may keep changing. What is wrong with this? Which of the things you have been told are your problem is the correct diagnosis and why? Are the other diagnoses wrong?

You can have more than one problem.

Could be several diagnoses are correct. You could have high blood pressure and still have diabetes. You may have Depression and Anxiety and still have Partner Relational Problems.

It could also be that none of the diagnoses are right on the money and that what you are being given is a “provisional” diagnosis. As more information comes in your diagnosis might get changed. I know this is frustrating for you, it bothers most professionals also, but the truth is that the correct diagnosis is not always that clear.

“Strict Criteria” leaves a lot of people out.

Mental health diagnoses, in practice, are a lot fuzzier than they look in the textbooks. When we read research reports these are based on “strict criteria.” This means that the research participants are fully screened by someone on the researcher’s team and then they, or their files, are often reviewed again. During this process lots of potential subjects are screened out.  Anyone who has ever had a substance use disorder is not included.

So if you have bipolar disorder and have abused alcohol – no research for or about you. The result of these screening out process is that we know a lot about people who have exactly one and only one issue but not so much about anyone who has two or more problems or whose symptoms do not exactly match the “strict criteria.” The problem with getting a correct diagnosis does not end with strict criteria.

Mental illness as a brain disorder.

Mental illness, as currently understood, includes most all thinking, feeling and behaving disorders. This creates a conflict when we start talking about “brain disorders.”

You could be born with a brain problem that makes you at more risk for depression – but then being neglected, abused or other sad life experiences cold overload your system and result in depression. So environment can change the brain. Learning can alter your mood and if you learned to be depressed you can unlearn it.

Life experiences can and do change the wiring in your brain.  As far as your brain is concerned every thought you have is an experience as the electrical impulses and the chemical messengers move through your brain.

Change your thinking and your feelings change. As your feelings change your behavior will change. New feelings, new behavior, and your diagnoses could change.

Changes in thinking are not the only way you can change your feelings.

This freeway in your brain and nervous system moves in both directions. Change your behavior and your feelings will start to change. As your feelings change your thinking will change.

You keep changing without trying.

As you add more years to your life experiences, I am avoiding saying that anyone is getting older, your brain undergoes changes. Some of this is the result of learning and the growing of nerve cells. Other parts of the changes include hormones, puberty, menopause and so on.

Some mental illnesses are first seen at certain times in people’s life. Schizophrenia symptoms are a lot more likely to first start or become pronounced enough to be recognized during the teen years or early twenty’s.

Bipolar Disorders do not get diagnosed until after you have had your first recognizable manic or hypomanic episode. The result is that most people first get a diagnosis of some kind of depression, with or without irritable mood and behavior, and then, later on, they may get a diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder.

As we age our symptoms may change and the diagnosis will change. The underlying person is still the same person, just the life problems they are working on have shifted.

If you do not feel that your current diagnosis is accurate, do not stress. You could try another provider or you could just wait and that diagnosis may change all on its own.

Diagnoses, like off the rack clothing rarely fit perfectly. What you need is a good enough fit that it assists you in developing a program of recovery. Sometimes that recovery program is primarily about managing your symptoms so you can stay out of the hospitals or institution. For other people recovery involves seeing how far they can take their life.

Personally, I am a believer in recovery. I have seen so many people with serious mental illnesses recover that I find it hard to believe there is anyone who can’t have some recovery in their life.

Recovery means different things to different people. Focus on what you can do, what you can improve and see where your recovery will take you. Don’t let that ill-fitting diagnoses deter you from making the recovery journey.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Two David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Amazon Author Page – David Joel Miller

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. A list of books I have read and can recommend is over at Recommended Books. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.

Is it the Bipolar or is it me? Confusion and self-doubt.

By David Joel Miller, MS, Licensed Therapist & Licensed Counselor.

Who am I?
Photo courtesy of pixabay.

The struggles to find you when you have Bipolar or another mental illness.

People who grow up with a mental illness have a difficult time finding out who they are separate from their disorder. The younger you are when the symptoms start the more difficult it is to find out who you are during those times the symptoms are at a severe point. People with other mental illnesses may experience this same confusion but it is easiest to illustrate by discussing the effects of Bipolar Disorder on self-doubt.

Youth with Bipolar disorder have a second set of tasks to navigate over and above those all teen’s experience. Finding you who you are is a necessary task of adolescence. Much of that sense of self is developed as a result of the experiences you have. For the person with Bipolar Disorder, the person who has those experiences changes depending on the severity of symptoms.

In the early stages of the disorder, the disease goes largely undiagnosed. The person who will someday get that bipolar diagnosis may spend 20 years or more struggling with out of control emotions before they discover that those unpredictable mood swings are a result of their disease, not some defect in who they are.

When you have symptoms, try to control them, but find you are out of control more than in, it is easy to begin to doubt yourself and to begin to hate yourself. Before receiving their diagnosis many youths with Bipolar Disorders have been led to believe they are “bad kids” and that they should be able to do things they find far outside their abilities.

The person with Bipolar Disorder will experience a large discrepancy between who they are supposed to be and who they are. Despite their best efforts, who they feel they are, will change depending on whether they are in a manic, hypomanic, depressive or mixed phase.

The peak onset for Bipolar is between fifteen and nineteen years of age, precisely those late teen years when you need to establish who you are as a separate person from your caregivers and friends.

The earlier the onset of Bipolar Disorder the more difficult it becomes to define what is the disorder and what part of these feeling and behaviors are you.

Often the person with Bipolar will report that they don’t know how they feel. A given situation will make them feel happy one day and sad or angry the next. This creates extreme self-doubt.

Having a mind or body that betrays you can lead to self-hate. In the early stages of Bipolar Disorder, before the diagnosis, there is a high risk that you will come to hate yourself for having uncontrollable and unpredictable moods.

Clients sometimes report during a severe episode “This is not who I am.” They have the feeling that there are three or more of them, the depressed person, the manic person and sometimes there is that person that is them without the symptoms.

Someone with Bipolar Disorder may find that they shift between being an introvert and being an extrovert depending on the state of their illness. They can easily become confused as to which is the real them.

After a particularly manic episode or a really low depressive episode, the person with Bipolar Disorder may find themselves saying “That is not me, I don’t want to be like that.”

The result of all these conflicts in their self-image can leave a person in the early phase of Bipolar Disorder with negative self-beliefs. These beliefs are likely to persist into adulthood and then change slowly if at all. The person that they find themselves to be on medication or after therapy is a whole different person to the previous untreated person.

One risk for the undiagnosed person is the tendency to become a chameleon. Not knowing who they really are deep down they try to blend in and assume the roles of others around them. This results in an unstable self that is one way today and another tomorrow.

A common refrain is “I don’t like myself.” Or “I can’t do anything right.” Shaking these beliefs and sorting out who you are separate from your disorder is a difficult but necessary process.

Because of the mood swings between depression and mania the person with bipolar disorder faces unique challenges in finding who they really are separate from their diagnosis.

People with other mental and emotional problems will expertise these conflicts in varying ways. The key task is to learn that you are not your diagnosis and that your condition does not define who and what you will become.

Staying connected with David Joel Miller

Three David Joel Miller Books are available now!

Bumps on the Road of Life. Whether you struggle with anxiety, depression, low motivation, or addiction, you can recover. Bumps on the Road of Life is the story of how people get off track and how to get your life out of the ditch.

Casino Robbery is a novel about a man with PTSD who must cope with his symptoms to solve a mystery and create a new life.

SasquatchWandering through a hole in time, they encounter Sasquatch. Can they survive? The guests had come to Meditation Mountain to find themselves. Trapped in the Menhirs during a sudden desert storm, two guests move through a porthole in time and encounter long extinct monsters. They want to get back to their own time, but the Sasquatch intends to kill them.

For these and my upcoming books; please visit my Author Page – David Joel Miller

Books are now available on Amazon, Kobo, iBooks, Barnes & Noble, and many other online stores.

Want the latest blog posts as they publish? Subscribe to this blog.

Want the latest on news from recoveryland, the field of counseling, my writing projects, speaking and teaching? Please sign up for my newsletter at – Newsletter. I promise not to share your email or to send you spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

For more about David Joel Miller and my work in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and Co-occurring disorders see my Facebook author’s page, davidjoelmillerwriter. If you are in the Fresno California area, information about my private practice is at counselorfresno.com.